IBM's Watson becomes 'The Debater'
#1
From Humans asking Computers Questions! to Computers asking Humans Questions! A.I has moved on!





Anthony.
Reply
#2
Anthony,

Just to think how much logic and understanding of human thought went into creating this app can be really mind-numbing. On top of that, it is the first real-life AI software I have ever seen that scoured the internet for relevant information just to make "informed" decisions. This appears to be a time where we will give another point for Sci-Fi movies in being ahead of its time.

The app in the video you shared reminds of the 2002 movie, "The Time Machine" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0268695/) where the library's holographic librarian, a computer AI, was able to connect to all the library computers from around the world to help it make informed decisions all at light speed due to fiber optics (I assume).

Now all we need is real looking holograms and the future is set.

Thank you so much for sharing this piece of history.


Walter Whitman
The Joyful Programmer
Dedicated to empowering computer programming hobbyists, tinkerers, amateurs, and enthusiasts.
profile for Walter Whitman at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers


Reply
#3
Walter's Quote: (Now all we need is real looking holograms and the future is set.)

We already have One Walter Smile

http://sheepridge.pandorabots.com/pandor...rame-voice


Anthony.
Reply
#4
Following on from Watson...The Smartest Machine On Earth

This is a must watch Video! Wink it's an Hour long! and well worth downloading from YouTube & Burning onto a DVD to watch at Home!

Enjoy!....


Anthony.



Reply
#5
More info on the Watson Phenomena! Smile


Anthony.

















Reply
#6
Photo 




Anthony.
Reply
#7
If we they can shrink all that down to the size of a human brain and allow it to run with very little energy, then we could see a Commander Data from Star Trek coming to a space port near you.

But speaking of which, how does Watson compare to Data? Let's look at the facts:

In the Star Trek episode, "The Measure of a Man", we learn that Data has a storage capacity of 800 quadrillion bits, and a total linear computational speed of 60 trillion operations per second (60 Teraflops per second). Let's break his storage capacity down into today's terms. Please note, I will be using the IEC binary notation measurement where each level is divisible by 8, instead of the commonly used metric system which is divisible by 10. So instead of saying 1,000 KiloBytes in one MegaByte, I would say that there are 1,024 KibiBytes in one MebiBytes.

The following information can be found at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix

IEC binary notation measurement: 8 Bits = 1 Byte * 1,024 Bytes = 1 KibiBytes * 1,024 KibiBytes = 1 MebiBytes * 1,024 MebiBytes = 1 GibiBytes * 1,024 GibiBytes = 1 TebiBytes * 1,024 TebiBytes = 1 PebiBytes * 1,024 PebiBytes = 1 ExbiBytes * 1,024 ExbiBytes = 1 ZebiBytes * 1,024 ZebiBytes = 1 YobiBytes

metric system: 8 Bits = 1 Byte * 1,000 Bytes = 1 KiloBytes * 1,000 KiloBytes = 1 MegaBytes * 1,000 MegaBytes = 1 GigaBytes * 1,000 GigaBytes = 1 TeraBytes * 1,000 TeraBytes = 1 PetaBytes * 1,000 PetaBytes = 1 ExaBytes * 1,000 ExaBytes = 1 ZettaBytes * 1,000 ZettaBytes = 1 YottaBytes


Here is the break down:

800 quadrillion bits = 100,000,000,000,000,000 Bytes
100,000,000,000,000,000 Bytes = 97,656,250,000,000 KibiBytes (or 100,000,000,000,000 KiloBytes)
97,656,250,000,000 KibiBytes = 95,367,431,640.625 MebiBytes (or 100,000,000,000 MegaBytes)
95,367,431,640.625 MebiBytes = 93,132,257.4615478515625 GibiBytes (or 100,000,000 GigaBytes)
93,132,257.4615478515625 GebiBytes = 90,949.47017729282379150390625 TebiBytes (or 100,000 TeraBytes)
90,949.47017729282379150390625 TebiBytes = 88.817841970012523234 PebiBytes (or 100 PetaBytes)

1 TeraByte = 1,000,000,000,000 Bytes
1 TebiByte = 1,099,511,627,776 Bytes


With the information above, Data can store 100,000 TeraByte hardrives (which you can buy at your local store) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_%28Star_Trek%29 of data inside his little head. In perspective, scientists estimate that the human brain can hold roughly 2.5 Terabytes of information [url]http://www.scientificamerican.com/articl...-capacity/[/url], [url]http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and...hold_.html[/url].

Here are some fun information sites: https://followthedata.wordpress.com/2014...estimates/ & [url]http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/Wh...-look-like[/url]

Now let's look at IBM Watson.

Watson has a computational speed of 80 trillion operations per second, which is 20 trillion more operations per second than Data. However, Watson only has 16 TeraBytes of memory, compared to Data's 100,000 TeraBytes.

The really interesting fact I came across was that Watson doesn't even place in the top 500 supercomputers. The fastest computer on the planet Earth is in China, and it is called,"Tianhe-2", and it runs at 33.86 petaflops (33.86 quadrillion floating point calculations per second - or 33,860 TeraFlops per second, over 564 times the speed of Data) with a theoretical peak performance of 54.9 petaflops (54.90 quadrillion floating point calculations per second - or 54,900 TeraFlops per second, 915 times the speed of Data). Tiamhe-2 has 11,811,160,064,000 Bits of memory versus Data's 800,000,000,000,000,000 which gives Data almost 67,733 times the amount of memory.

So at this point in human history, we can surpass Data in computational speed, but we have yet to get above a fraction of Data's memory capacity for a single system.

Here is information about the Tianhe-2 supercomputer:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOP500

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianhe-2

I can't wait to see what the future holds for computers! I believe that we are getting close to the physical limits of memory storage on a single chip, so until we find other means of storing information, memory will not improve by much. One theory I came up with back in the mid-nineties is instead of storing a single bit in a memory cell, store multiple bits. If we could figure out a way to read an electrical charge instead of a magnetic charge, we could possibly see Bytes to Kilobytes stored in a single memory cell, which would allow us to surpass Data's memory capacity by leaps and bounds. But, I am a dreamer and I love to dream about this kind of stuff.


Walter Whitman
The Joyful Programmer
See My Youtube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkkN3_B...c9a1MoUr1A
Dedicated to empowering computer programming hobbyists, tinkerers, amateurs, and enthusiasts.
profile for Walter Whitman at Stack Overflow, Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers


Reply
#8
Amazing Info Walter Smile

Apparently this is the Future of Computing/Computers...

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/schr...ing-03169/


Anthony.
Reply